Within
Normal Limits
of
Reason

"Chance is the very guide of life"

"In practical medicine the facts are far too few for them to enter into the calculus of probabilities... in applied medicine we are always concerned with the individual" -- S. D. Poisson

May 31, 2005

Identification of cis-Regulatory Elements and Their Combination in Mammalian Promoter Sequences




OMICS:

Large-scale genome annotations, based largely on gene prediction programs, may be inaccurate in their predictions of transcription start sites, so that the identification of promoter regions remains unreliable. Here we focus on the identification of reliable gene promoter regions, critical to the understanding of transcriptional regulation. We report the construction of databases of upstream sequences Human Upstream and Mouse Upstream based on information from both the human and mouse genomes and the database of expressed sequence tags (dbEST). Using the ENSEMBL generic genome annotation system, our approach allows more reliable identification of transcript start sites, and therefore extraction of more reliable promoters regions. The Human Upstream and Human Upstream databases are available free of charge.

Technorati Tags:
/ / / / / /

1 comment:

bubbalop said...

Napa, CA (PRWEB) February 3, 2006 -- California Peptide Research, Inc. (www.californiapeptide.com), a peptide synthesis company located in Napa, California, announced today that they have synthetic obestatin available for bio medical research. Obestatin is a new discovery in the search of a real treatment for obesity, and shows great promise.

The beautiful Napa Valley, a place that most folks associate with fine wines, beautiful scenery and bed and breakfasts is also a place that produces peptides for research. Among the many peptides produced there, is one that is a recent discovery and may help millions that want to lose weight.

The peptide is called obestatin and it was discovered by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. It is one of many appetite-regulating hormones found in several mammals, including humans and may be the key to an actual treatment for obesity.

Obestatin is a sibling hormone to the hunger hormone known as ghrelin, which is an appetite-booster made in the stomach. However, scientists are calling obestatin the "anti-ghrelin" because it works exactly the opposite of ghrelin.

Early tests of the effects of obestatin in rats shows great promise. Rats injected with obestatin ate less and lost weight. More research needs to be done, of course in the months and years ahead to ensure it does in humans what it apparently is doing for the lab rats.

More information for researchers can be found on California Peptide Research, Inc.'s website www.californiapeptide.com.

California Peptide Research, Inc. offers a wide variety of peptides including Obestatin, Adrenomedullins, Endothelins, Endothelin Antagonists, Enzyme Substrates and Inhibitors, Sulfated Peptides such as CCK and Caerulien, and a great number of Beta Amyloids which have been found to offer useful tools in Alzheimer's research.